Your Debt Recovery Experts

Chasing for payment? Recognise these characters?

‘Our Favourites’

We all love our customers who pay to terms, we don’t need to remind them, payment comes through before or on the due date and we all want more of these customers, these are our favourites.

‘The Busy Guys’

We’ve all learnt to manage the customers who ‘thought they’d paid’, ‘meant to pay’ or ‘forgot to pay’, these guys are busy people, and we know they’ll pay. We schedule our phone calls every month, following the same process and the arrangement works, we know the routine.

‘The Delayers’

Yes, they’re the ones, they say they didn’t receive an invoice or they want a copy of a delivery docket, but they only tell you when chased for payment. We manage these guys like the busy guys, we know the routine!

‘The Jugglers’

Then we’ve got our customers who can have cash flow issues. These guys intend to pay and they take some chasing, the timing of payment varies but generally speaking we get there in the end. But sometimes these guys are too embarrassed to let you know the issues they have. Let’s face it, juggling cash flow happens to the best of us, but sometimes these guys can go silent, and when payments get too far overdue, the situation becomes awkward, for everyone. This is when we wish someone else would deal with the matter, right?

‘The Avoiders’

Another character we wish someone else would take off our hands is the ‘I avoid paying’ or ‘I won’t pay in full’ type of character. These are the guys you reflect upon and wish you had asked for payment up front or not been so keen to accept their urgent request. It may have been the first time you supplied to them and you were keen to take on a new customer. The excitement of a new account has now turned to regret at giving them credit terms.

We’re here to help

Don’t forget, we’re here to make it easier to reopen lines of communication with cash flow juggling customers, even if sometimes it means entering into a payment arrangement on your behalf.

For customers who are refusing to pay, we can have the difficult conversations so you don’t have to. We are used to managing these types of characters and we can have success where you may not have.

Debts aren’t just bad for business, they’re stressful.

Collecting Debt from Individuals

We are often asked, as a mercantile agency, how we approach collecting debt from individuals.

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) have produced a guideline. This guideline helps us to understand how the Commonwealth consumer protection laws apply to debt collectors, as well as in house collection departments within businesses. The guideline is online: https://www.accc.gov.au/publications/debt-collection-guideline-for-collectors-creditors

How may contact be made with a debtor?

If an individual owes you money and will not pay, you are entitled to contact them to ask for payment. You can contact them:

  • by phone
  • in writing (includes emailing, texting and social media contact)
  • in person.

 Am I restricted to when I can make contact?

Contact with a debtor must be made at reasonable hours, taking into account their circumstances and reasonable wishes. The following can be considered appropriate times and are the local times in the debtor’s state or territory:

  • phone contact between the hours of 7:30am–9:00pm on weekdays; and
  • 9:00am–9:00pm on weekends
  • No contact recommended on National public holidays

Face to face contact should be an option of last resort. Generally, face to face contact should only be made if reasonable attempts to contact a debtor by less intrusive means such as phone calls, emails or letters have failed, and face to face contact is considered appropriate and necessary. Reasonable hours of contact for face to face contact are:

  • 9:00am–9:00pm on weekdays and weekends
  • No contact recommended on National public holiday

How often can I make contact?

Debtors are entitled to be free from excessive communication or undue harassment. As a guide, contact should be limited (unless requested or agreed otherwise) to a maximum of 3 phone calls or letters per week (or 10 per month).

Generally, visits to the debtors home (or another agreed location) is not recommended and should only take place if there is no other way to make effective contact with the debtor, or if asked (or agreed) to a visit.

If repayment arrangements can be worked out over the phone or by letter, then face-to-face contact should not be necessary.

You must not:

  • threaten
  • harass
  • physically intimidate the debtor.